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Amilcar de Castro

1920 — 2002

Untitled, Déc. de 90
Untitled,
Acrylic on canvas 51x51 inches
C 2307, 90´s
C 2307,
Acrylic on canvas 51x77 inches
CDQ 30, 90´s
CDQ 30,
Corten steel 47x47x1 inches
CDR-38, 1996
CDR-38,
Corten steel 20x20x0,5 inches
CDV-20, 1995
CDV-20,
Corten steel 14x5,5 inches
CDV-24, 1995
CDV-24,
Corten steel 10x5 inches
Untitled, 90´s
Untitled,
Wood and steel 27,5x27,5x8 inches
Untitled, 90´s
Untitled,
Wood 12x12x3 inches
Untitled, 90´s
Untitled,
Steel 39x39x1 inches
Untitled, 70´s
Untitled,
Acrylic on canvas 67x39 inches
Untitled, 90´s
Untitled,
Acrylic on canvas 69x120 inches
Untitled, 70´s
Untitled,
Acrylic on canvas 51x63 inches
Untitled, 1996
Untitled,
Acrylic on canvas 83x83 inches
Shiva, 1955
Shiva,
Iron 59x35x61 inches
Untitled, Déc. de 90
Untitled,
Corten Steel 8x24x0,5 inches


In the 1970s and 80s, he lectured at the Faculty of Fine Arts of the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), retiring from teaching in 1990 to dedicate himself exclusively to his art. In 1999, he presented new works at the exhibition held at the Hélio Oiticica Art Centre, in Rio de Janeiro, in which he respected the limits of resistance of the flagstones of the historic building. Next to the building, in Tiradentes Square, he exhibited a set of monumental pieces. In his last sculptures, removed from Constructivist orthodoxy, his point of departure is no longer the regular geometric figures that characterized one period of his output. For many years without a base, his works extend horizontally over the ground, carrying on a dialogue with the landscape.

In a career of some five decades, Amilcar de Castro experimented with the infinite possibilities of the plane. Resisting an excessive rationalism, his folds make geometry malleable and more human.

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